redstapler: (DW - Ghostbusters)
The question has been asked, and I feel like the answer deserves its own LJ post. This is not intended to be a definitive answer, but what it means to me. I, as I have stated before both in the comments to these posts and elsewhere, acknowledge my privilege as both someone who always had healthful food options, and am not and never really have been what society calls "fat.*" Please feel free to add your own answers to this question.

You can't tell why a person is fat. They could have PCOS, they could be on steroids or other medicines that have weight-gain side effects, they could have an underactive thyroid, they could have sleep apnea, they could have insulin resistance, their mother could have just died and they're taking the one really good reason to eat their feelings for once, they could be recovering from an injury, they could be going through a bad financial or prohibitively busy period requiring them to eat fast food and take away, they could have decided that the vicious cycle of yo-yo dieting was more harmful than the weight they'd put on without it, they could be in the middle of the "gain" period of a vicious cycle of yo-yo dieting, they could be at the thinnest they've ever been, but you don't know that because all you see is a fat person.

YOU HAVE NO WAY OF KNOWING AND FAT SHAMING IS ASSUMING IT IS BECAUSE THEY ARE LAZY AND DON'T KNOW HOW TO EAT HEALTHY FOODS.

Concern trolling, which is what it's called when someone coos "But I'm worried for their heaaaaaaaaalth" without knowing an iota about that person's actual state of health.

I had a friend in college who absolutely was what society called "fat." Except for the part that she ate very healthfully (not easy in a dormitory setting), and worked out more often than anyone I knew not on a sports team. She didn't do these things because she was trying to lose weight. She did them because she loved cooking and loved being fit and strong.

If your state of health is good, and you are fat? Awesome, don't change unless you want to.

It's anyone giving you grief for the weight of your body, whether they call you a Lazy Fatty Fat Fat or tell you how worried they are for your pancreatic functions and the state of your knees. Or the worst, "I want you to be happy." Screw you if you think someone has to be skinny to be happy.

What's worse is that shame tactics? They don't work. Either they can be wholesale ignored, but more realistically, it will cause other, harsher, longer-lasting problems.

That, my dears, is fat shaming.

ETA: I don't mean this edit as a WHAT ABOUT THE SKINNY FOLKS, but a continued interest in shutting down body policing. All of what I said above about fat people? The same goes for skinny people. You don't know why they're skinny, so don't assume, and as the Great Wil Wheaton told us: DON'T BE A DICK.

*At my highest weight, I was definitely described as curvy, zaftig, and possibly even "thick." The only fat shaming I ever really received was the honking facefulls women usually receive from their mothers**, and the occasional guy not being into me. In other words: WHOA NELLY PRIVILEGE.

**My mother, it must also be noted, who was nine inches taller than me, and with a totally different body type. What numbers made sense for her SO didn't make sense for me.
redstapler: (Default)
The question has been asked, and I feel like the answer deserves its own LJ post. This is not intended to be a definitive answer, but what it means to me. I, as I have stated before both in the comments to these posts and elsewhere, acknowledge my privilege as both someone who always had healthful food options, and am not and never really have been what society calls "fat.*" Please feel free to add your own answers to this question.

You can't tell why a person is fat. They could have PCOS, they could be on steroids or other medicines that have weight-gain side effects, they could have an underactive thyroid, they could have sleep apnea, they could have insulin resistance, their mother could have just died and they're taking the one really good reason to eat their feelings for once, they could be recovering from an injury, they could be going through a bad financial or prohibitively busy period requiring them to eat fast food and take away, they could have decided that the vicious cycle of yo-yo dieting was more harmful than the weight they'd put on without it, they could be in the middle of the "gain" period of a vicious cycle of yo-yo dieting, they could be at the thinnest they've ever been, but you don't know that because all you see is a fat person.

YOU HAVE NO WAY OF KNOWING AND FAT SHAMING IS ASSUMING IT IS BECAUSE THEY ARE LAZY AND DON'T KNOW HOW TO EAT HEALTHY FOODS.

Concern trolling, which is what it's called when someone coos "But I'm worried for their heaaaaaaaaalth" without knowing an iota about that person's actual state of health.

I had a friend in college who absolutely was what society called "fat." Except for the part that she ate very healthfully (not easy in a dormitory setting), and worked out more often than anyone I knew not on a sports team. She didn't do these things because she was trying to lose weight. She did them because she loved cooking and loved being fit and strong.

If your state of health is good, and you are fat? Awesome, don't change unless you want to.

It's anyone giving you grief for the weight of your body, whether they call you a Lazy Fatty Fat Fat or tell you how worried they are for your pancreatic functions and the state of your knees. Or the worst, "I want you to be happy." Screw you if you think someone has to be skinny to be happy.

What's worse is that shame tactics? They don't work. Either they can be wholesale ignored, but more realistically, it will cause other, harsher, longer-lasting problems.

That, my dears, is fat shaming.

ETA: I don't mean this edit as a WHAT ABOUT THE SKINNY FOLKS, but a continued interest in shutting down body policing. All of what I said above about fat people? The same goes for skinny people. You don't know why they're skinny, so don't assume, and as the Great Wil Wheaton told us: DON'T BE A DICK.

*At my highest weight, I was definitely described as curvy, zaftig, and possibly even "thick." The only fat shaming I ever really received was the honking facefulls women usually receive from their mothers**, and the occasional guy not being into me. In other words: WHOA NELLY PRIVILEGE.

**My mother, it must also be noted, who was nine inches taller than me, and with a totally different body type. What numbers made sense for her SO didn't make sense for me.
redstapler: (Hmm)
I confess, I haven't seen an episode of Jamie Oliver's Food Revolution.

I've heard two very contradictory opinions from sources I trust.

One point of view says that he's addressing a very real problem about the quality of food in schools, the growing dependence on pre-made meals, and worse, the growing ignorance of basic cooking skills.

The other point of view says that he's a privileged wankadoodle who thinks money and time grow on trees, and what is it any of his business what people eat or weigh?

Not having seen the show, but having opinions about this sort of topic, I imagine the truth is somewhere in the middle.

On his website, there is now a petition.

In one box, it has this message from Jamie: "If you care about the health of your children and the food they eat please sign this petition now."

In a box next to it is has this message "from you" for the petition: "Sign Jamie's petition to save cooking skills and improve school food.

I support the Food Revolution. America's kids need better food at school and better health prospects. We need to keep cooking skills alive."


I feel like those messages are contradictory.

Jamie's message conflates weight and health, which is a HUGE issue.

"Our" message demands better and more healthy food at schools, and to improve education on how to cook. That's kind of important.

Not to quote a truly bizarre source, but uh...did any of you ever see the movie Heavyweights?

It's about a kid who goes to a fat camp that got sold to a fitness madman (played hilariously by Ben Stiller in an obvious precursor to his role in Dodgeball), the kids stage a coup, and run the camp their way.

In their renewed vision of the camp, they have a fucking blast being kids in a warm, positive environment, and one of the clips in the montage includes a cooking class. Not a "how to cook low fat meals" class, but an honest to goodness class on how to cook food that tastes good.

I've seen with my own eyes people eat more healthfully once they start to learn to cook because they're caring about the quality of the components they're using, not which frozen meal is on special that week.

I realize this veers back into the "money and time don't grow on trees" category. However, I get the sense that part of "The Food Revolution" is a movement to bring better food options to underserved neighborhoods.

Anyway, I hope that the good intentions of this show and movement aren't paving a certain road. I hope that there's an understanding that weight and health aren't one and the same. I hope that there's an understanding that sometimes living off of canned and frozen items is all a person can do.

But I really hope that this show isn't all the bad that I've heard, and none of the good.

ETA: [livejournal.com profile] kalmn points to this post on Shakesville in which they point out all the ways the Revolution failed one town. It's pretty jarring.
redstapler: (Default)
I confess, I haven't seen an episode of Jamie Oliver's Food Revolution.

I've heard two very contradictory opinions from sources I trust.

One point of view says that he's addressing a very real problem about the quality of food in schools, the growing dependence on pre-made meals, and worse, the growing ignorance of basic cooking skills.

The other point of view says that he's a privileged wankadoodle who thinks money and time grow on trees, and what is it any of his business what people eat or weigh?

Not having seen the show, but having opinions about this sort of topic, I imagine the truth is somewhere in the middle.

On his website, there is now a petition.

In one box, it has this message from Jamie: "If you care about the health of your children and the food they eat please sign this petition now."

In a box next to it is has this message "from you" for the petition: "Sign Jamie's petition to save cooking skills and improve school food.

I support the Food Revolution. America's kids need better food at school and better health prospects. We need to keep cooking skills alive."


I feel like those messages are contradictory.

Jamie's message conflates weight and health, which is a HUGE issue.

"Our" message demands better and more healthy food at schools, and to improve education on how to cook. That's kind of important.

Not to quote a truly bizarre source, but uh...did any of you ever see the movie Heavyweights?

It's about a kid who goes to a fat camp that got sold to a fitness madman (played hilariously by Ben Stiller in an obvious precursor to his role in Dodgeball), the kids stage a coup, and run the camp their way.

In their renewed vision of the camp, they have a fucking blast being kids in a warm, positive environment, and one of the clips in the montage includes a cooking class. Not a "how to cook low fat meals" class, but an honest to goodness class on how to cook food that tastes good.

I've seen with my own eyes people eat more healthfully once they start to learn to cook because they're caring about the quality of the components they're using, not which frozen meal is on special that week.

I realize this veers back into the "money and time don't grow on trees" category. However, I get the sense that part of "The Food Revolution" is a movement to bring better food options to underserved neighborhoods.

Anyway, I hope that the good intentions of this show and movement aren't paving a certain road. I hope that there's an understanding that weight and health aren't one and the same. I hope that there's an understanding that sometimes living off of canned and frozen items is all a person can do.

But I really hope that this show isn't all the bad that I've heard, and none of the good.

ETA: [livejournal.com profile] kalmn points to this post on Shakesville in which they point out all the ways the Revolution failed one town. It's pretty jarring.
redstapler: (Snapes on a...you know)
EDIT: I'm reposting this with some new links, including another SWA blog post, and Kevin Smith's reply.

While waiting for my connecting flight out of Atlanta last Tuesday (a rant of its own), I briefly spoke to a lovely young woman as we all tried to scout out the ever-elusive working outlet for our phones, laptops, etc. I say lovely because I thought she was pretty, and I really liked the shade of green she was wearing. Anyway, that's not important. What's important is she was heavy set. Once we boarded the plane I witnessed the following exchange:

Douchehat: Excuse me, flight attendant?

Flight Attendant: Yes?

Douchehat: Can I switch seats? The girl next to me is big. Really big.

Flight Attendant: Sorry, sir, you'll have to wait until the flight has boarded completely, and then you can switch seats if there is one available.

I must also note the flight attendant said this with her voice dripping with irritation. She sounded just as shocked and offended and I probably looked. Oh, and he was referring to that same woman I'd spoken to at the gate. Also, he said all of this loud enough that the back half of the plane heard him.

Nice, Douchehat.

The flight boarded, and there were a lot of empty seats (it was a late flight), and he ended up having the entire row right behind me to himself.

I almost wish I'd farted in his face.

So by now, you've probably all heard about Kevin Smith getting thrown off a Southwest Air flight on Saturday. (Link goes to the round up and discussion on Shapely Prose.)



I managed to catch the beginnings of this in almost-real time that night, thanks to Twitter. I was absolutely AGOG at what was happening. It was kind of a thing of beauty.

Here's a few other links you may want to check out, if you're interested in the unfolding of this beautiful PR nightmare:



So yeah.

There's a lot of discussion to be had over a lot of the stuff being said by both parties. Kevin Smith doesn't apologize for being fat, but he'll often use misogynist or fat-shaming language in his ranting. But then he'll also go on to tell the story of the heavy woman on the flight he was allowed to stay on, who was sitting in his row. The flight attendant came by and tried to take the woman off the flight. Hearing Kevin Smith's ire over that situation was amazing. He also acknowledged his privilege as a man, and a rich one at that. He acknowledged that the average fat woman experiences harassment and discrimination that a fat man never would.

I can't wait to see how Southwest weathers this. It sounds like a LOT of people are taking their business elsewhere.

redstapler: (Default)
EDIT: I'm reposting this with some new links, including another SWA blog post, and Kevin Smith's reply.

While waiting for my connecting flight out of Atlanta last Tuesday (a rant of its own), I briefly spoke to a lovely young woman as we all tried to scout out the ever-elusive working outlet for our phones, laptops, etc. I say lovely because I thought she was pretty, and I really liked the shade of green she was wearing. Anyway, that's not important. What's important is she was heavy set. Once we boarded the plane I witnessed the following exchange:

Douchehat: Excuse me, flight attendant?

Flight Attendant: Yes?

Douchehat: Can I switch seats? The girl next to me is big. Really big.

Flight Attendant: Sorry, sir, you'll have to wait until the flight has boarded completely, and then you can switch seats if there is one available.

I must also note the flight attendant said this with her voice dripping with irritation. She sounded just as shocked and offended and I probably looked. Oh, and he was referring to that same woman I'd spoken to at the gate. Also, he said all of this loud enough that the back half of the plane heard him.

Nice, Douchehat.

The flight boarded, and there were a lot of empty seats (it was a late flight), and he ended up having the entire row right behind me to himself.

I almost wish I'd farted in his face.

So by now, you've probably all heard about Kevin Smith getting thrown off a Southwest Air flight on Saturday. (Link goes to the round up and discussion on Shapely Prose.)



I managed to catch the beginnings of this in almost-real time that night, thanks to Twitter. I was absolutely AGOG at what was happening. It was kind of a thing of beauty.

Here's a few other links you may want to check out, if you're interested in the unfolding of this beautiful PR nightmare:



So yeah.

There's a lot of discussion to be had over a lot of the stuff being said by both parties. Kevin Smith doesn't apologize for being fat, but he'll often use misogynist or fat-shaming language in his ranting. But then he'll also go on to tell the story of the heavy woman on the flight he was allowed to stay on, who was sitting in his row. The flight attendant came by and tried to take the woman off the flight. Hearing Kevin Smith's ire over that situation was amazing. He also acknowledged his privilege as a man, and a rich one at that. He acknowledged that the average fat woman experiences harassment and discrimination that a fat man never would.

I can't wait to see how Southwest weathers this. It sounds like a LOT of people are taking their business elsewhere.

redstapler: (Red Stapler)
Red Stapler has been updated.

This one's pretty irritating.
redstapler: (Default)
Red Stapler has been updated.

This one's pretty irritating.

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