redstapler: (Default)
Not too long ago, one of the co-founders of my company slunk through the office and quietly distributed Nerf guns to everyone. A short-lived Nerf war started, which was quickly shooshed and shut down by our Executive Producer.

Ever since, the tell-tale whistle of Nerf ballistics can be heard through the office at random intervals. No full-on war has started again, but skirmishes still occur.

One afternoon, late in the day, I found myself in a standoff with a friend. And then suddenly, something hit me in the right butt-cheek. Having only seen my friend with a weapon in his hand, I proceeded to empty the rest of my clip at him, as he protested that it hadn't been him.

He also swore he wouldn't tell me who had taken the shot.

I pressed him for why, and he finally side-stepped apologetically to the phrase, "Bros before hos," further backpedaling with, "You're not a 'ho, but you're also not a bro."

And that was when I got offended.

This is a dude I'd talked with at length about video games, music, and drugs. We'd talked about relationships and our families. I often gave him a lift home.

At no point did I ever think I'd be considered "other" simply because I'm a woman.

But apparently I was.

People, this is rape culture distilled. If he wasn't going to tell me who shot me in the butt with a Nerf dart because of perceived gender difference, what the hell else won't he interfere with? Even if he doesn't realize the scalable nature of this stance?

I know this guy thinks of himself as a good guy--and he is! But...his firm insistence that he "couldn't sell out a bro" tells me that in his eyes, as cool as he may think I am, I'm still "other," and possibly "lesser," even if he doesn't realize it.

At its bare bones, this is a story of someone defending another's actions simply because of his gender versus mine. And that shit ain't cool.
redstapler: (Default)

Back in 2007, I worked for a now-defunct adult website.


In preparation for recording videos, one of my bosses ordered the big, phonebook sized costume catalogs from companies like Leg Avenue. I leafed through them with fascination, because, after all, I'm a costume geek at heart.


And then suddenly it dawned on me:


We, as a society, have so bought in to the "Halloween is the time to for women dress like a stripper" idea, that literally, we go to costume stores and buy actual costumes marketed to the adult industry the other eleven months of the year.


There is so much to be said here involving slut shaming, stigmatization of sex workers, the virgin/whore dichotomy, the commoditization of women's bodies, etc etc etc.


There's nothing wrong with sexy costumes, please don't misunderstand me. I just wanted to highlight the extremely literal manifestation of this societal idea.

redstapler: (Default)
So there's been a lovely kerfuffle going on this week, the simple summary of which is, Can you be a hot girl and a nerd?

Leaving aside the irritating use of "girl" to describe adult women, I haven't really had any commentary other than a side-eye.

I finally figured out my response, left as a comment on the above linked post.

Here it is. Ready?

If you can’t be a hot girl and a nerd, what the hell have my best girl friends and I been doing since childhood?

Sheesh.

That’s really all I have to say on the subject, with a healthy punctuation of a full-body eyeroll.


There you go. There's my soundbite.

redstapler: (Default)
In my previous post, I linked to the Dragon*Con shenanigans.

The thing that I kept seeing in a lot of the comments were sentence fragments like, "I wasn't even showing much skin" or "I was totally covered" or "I had been wearing a far skimpier costume earlier..."

WHAT YOU WEAR DOES NOT EXCUSE SHITBAGGERY DIRECTED AT YOU BY OTHER HUMANS.

It's Dragon*Con! You're there to wear skin-tight spandex and run around like you're Power Girl. Or wear a corset and bustle and be a Steampunk explorer.

OR WHATEVER.

What you wear, no matter how skimpy, no matter how much alcohol you or others drink, does not give a single solitary person the right to touch, grab, or even talk to you if you don't want to deal with them.

By all means, please, please report incidents of harassment, but can the meme of what you were wearing at the time die?
redstapler: (Hmm)
I confess, I haven't seen an episode of Jamie Oliver's Food Revolution.

I've heard two very contradictory opinions from sources I trust.

One point of view says that he's addressing a very real problem about the quality of food in schools, the growing dependence on pre-made meals, and worse, the growing ignorance of basic cooking skills.

The other point of view says that he's a privileged wankadoodle who thinks money and time grow on trees, and what is it any of his business what people eat or weigh?

Not having seen the show, but having opinions about this sort of topic, I imagine the truth is somewhere in the middle.

On his website, there is now a petition.

In one box, it has this message from Jamie: "If you care about the health of your children and the food they eat please sign this petition now."

In a box next to it is has this message "from you" for the petition: "Sign Jamie's petition to save cooking skills and improve school food.

I support the Food Revolution. America's kids need better food at school and better health prospects. We need to keep cooking skills alive."


I feel like those messages are contradictory.

Jamie's message conflates weight and health, which is a HUGE issue.

"Our" message demands better and more healthy food at schools, and to improve education on how to cook. That's kind of important.

Not to quote a truly bizarre source, but uh...did any of you ever see the movie Heavyweights?

It's about a kid who goes to a fat camp that got sold to a fitness madman (played hilariously by Ben Stiller in an obvious precursor to his role in Dodgeball), the kids stage a coup, and run the camp their way.

In their renewed vision of the camp, they have a fucking blast being kids in a warm, positive environment, and one of the clips in the montage includes a cooking class. Not a "how to cook low fat meals" class, but an honest to goodness class on how to cook food that tastes good.

I've seen with my own eyes people eat more healthfully once they start to learn to cook because they're caring about the quality of the components they're using, not which frozen meal is on special that week.

I realize this veers back into the "money and time don't grow on trees" category. However, I get the sense that part of "The Food Revolution" is a movement to bring better food options to underserved neighborhoods.

Anyway, I hope that the good intentions of this show and movement aren't paving a certain road. I hope that there's an understanding that weight and health aren't one and the same. I hope that there's an understanding that sometimes living off of canned and frozen items is all a person can do.

But I really hope that this show isn't all the bad that I've heard, and none of the good.

ETA: [livejournal.com profile] kalmn points to this post on Shakesville in which they point out all the ways the Revolution failed one town. It's pretty jarring.
redstapler: (Default)
I confess, I haven't seen an episode of Jamie Oliver's Food Revolution.

I've heard two very contradictory opinions from sources I trust.

One point of view says that he's addressing a very real problem about the quality of food in schools, the growing dependence on pre-made meals, and worse, the growing ignorance of basic cooking skills.

The other point of view says that he's a privileged wankadoodle who thinks money and time grow on trees, and what is it any of his business what people eat or weigh?

Not having seen the show, but having opinions about this sort of topic, I imagine the truth is somewhere in the middle.

On his website, there is now a petition.

In one box, it has this message from Jamie: "If you care about the health of your children and the food they eat please sign this petition now."

In a box next to it is has this message "from you" for the petition: "Sign Jamie's petition to save cooking skills and improve school food.

I support the Food Revolution. America's kids need better food at school and better health prospects. We need to keep cooking skills alive."


I feel like those messages are contradictory.

Jamie's message conflates weight and health, which is a HUGE issue.

"Our" message demands better and more healthy food at schools, and to improve education on how to cook. That's kind of important.

Not to quote a truly bizarre source, but uh...did any of you ever see the movie Heavyweights?

It's about a kid who goes to a fat camp that got sold to a fitness madman (played hilariously by Ben Stiller in an obvious precursor to his role in Dodgeball), the kids stage a coup, and run the camp their way.

In their renewed vision of the camp, they have a fucking blast being kids in a warm, positive environment, and one of the clips in the montage includes a cooking class. Not a "how to cook low fat meals" class, but an honest to goodness class on how to cook food that tastes good.

I've seen with my own eyes people eat more healthfully once they start to learn to cook because they're caring about the quality of the components they're using, not which frozen meal is on special that week.

I realize this veers back into the "money and time don't grow on trees" category. However, I get the sense that part of "The Food Revolution" is a movement to bring better food options to underserved neighborhoods.

Anyway, I hope that the good intentions of this show and movement aren't paving a certain road. I hope that there's an understanding that weight and health aren't one and the same. I hope that there's an understanding that sometimes living off of canned and frozen items is all a person can do.

But I really hope that this show isn't all the bad that I've heard, and none of the good.

ETA: [livejournal.com profile] kalmn points to this post on Shakesville in which they point out all the ways the Revolution failed one town. It's pretty jarring.
redstapler: (PG Feminist)
Despite having two different containers of it, I forgot to put a deodorant in my gym bag this morning.

I had just enough time before work this morning to hit the Duane Reade in my building before going upstairs.

I grabbed a box of the Secret Prescription Strength For Athletes with "Marathon Scent" or some silly name like that. Point being: it's targeted at athletes, which I like to fancy myself as. Okay, maybe just "athletic."

ANYWAY.

I got upstairs and put it on, and wouldn't you know it, it smells...manly.

This is a Secret product, but it smells like it should be packaged as Sportstick.

If I wanted to smell like Sportstick, I would have bought Sportstick.

Sigh.
redstapler: (Default)
Despite having two different containers of it, I forgot to put a deodorant in my gym bag this morning.

I had just enough time before work this morning to hit the Duane Reade in my building before going upstairs.

I grabbed a box of the Secret Prescription Strength For Athletes with "Marathon Scent" or some silly name like that. Point being: it's targeted at athletes, which I like to fancy myself as. Okay, maybe just "athletic."

ANYWAY.

I got upstairs and put it on, and wouldn't you know it, it smells...manly.

This is a Secret product, but it smells like it should be packaged as Sportstick.

If I wanted to smell like Sportstick, I would have bought Sportstick.

Sigh.

Oh, FFS

Apr. 16th, 2008 09:23 am
redstapler: (Red Stapler)
Crazy McBatshit what hates Joss Whedon is at it again!

This time on Crazy McBatshit Presents: A RADFEM ANALYSIS OF "OUR MRS. REYNOLDS."

I hope your ::facepalm:: muscles are in good working order folks, cos they're about to GET A WORKOUT.

Oh, FFS

Apr. 16th, 2008 09:23 am
redstapler: (Default)
Crazy McBatshit what hates Joss Whedon is at it again!

This time on Crazy McBatshit Presents: A RADFEM ANALYSIS OF "OUR MRS. REYNOLDS."

I hope your ::facepalm:: muscles are in good working order folks, cos they're about to GET A WORKOUT.

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