redstapler: (Mustard)
I don't even know anymore.

I trust the editing on this episode less than all the others.

I don't know why the school board official in charge of the lunch programs ordered processed food for 2011 after, supposedly, the town got the money for the fresh food and the retraining and beefing up (hurr) of the cook staff. This never gets explained.

I don't know why the parents of the kids start sending their kids to school with brown bag lunches. If money is a factor--and I'd be surprised if it wasn't--why are they paying likely more out of pocket to send their kids with lunch rather than having them pay there? (Do the kids in the elementary school pay? I never figured that out. Ditto for the high school kids. Are they bringing lunch money? Is it wholly funded by the school system? I just don't know.) The kids with the brown bag lunches also never gets explained.

I didn't understand a thing in this episode. It all seemed random causes and random effects, but nothing seemed to line up.

It was nice to see the cooks of the elementary school on Jamie's side, if only because they were on the side of giving the kids fresh food and not processed.

But none of the "backsliding" in the town ever really gets explained.

What the hell did I just watch?
redstapler: (Default)
I don't even know anymore.

I trust the editing on this episode less than all the others.

I don't know why the school board official in charge of the lunch programs ordered processed food for 2011 after, supposedly, the town got the money for the fresh food and the retraining and beefing up (hurr) of the cook staff. This never gets explained.

I don't know why the parents of the kids start sending their kids to school with brown bag lunches. If money is a factor--and I'd be surprised if it wasn't--why are they paying likely more out of pocket to send their kids with lunch rather than having them pay there? (Do the kids in the elementary school pay? I never figured that out. Ditto for the high school kids. Are they bringing lunch money? Is it wholly funded by the school system? I just don't know.) The kids with the brown bag lunches also never gets explained.

I didn't understand a thing in this episode. It all seemed random causes and random effects, but nothing seemed to line up.

It was nice to see the cooks of the elementary school on Jamie's side, if only because they were on the side of giving the kids fresh food and not processed.

But none of the "backsliding" in the town ever really gets explained.

What the hell did I just watch?
redstapler: (Mustard)
Zuh?

I don't know what y'all are saying about "it gets better."

It's gotten worse.

They keep trotting out Death Fats tearfully telling us how their fat is killing them, or family members of people who've died because of complications from obesity.

Jamie finally talks to skinny teenagers, and instead of talking about health, he tells them that french fries will make their bottoms wider.

He shows that crappy DJ a fucking death fat coffin specially designed for a larger corpse.

THIS ISN'T BETTER, PEOPLE, THIS IS WORSE.

Ep 5 Edit: Hooray for the local hospital admins (all of whom were thin, btw) calling him out on his fat-shaming PR stunts. (Namely, taking the DJ to the funeral home to see the oversize coffin.)

I'm also interested to note that a lot of the kids in the high school aren't fat. There's some, but the ZOMG DETHFATZ they keep trotting out don't seem to be the norm...at least not in these shots.

If there's anything that's truly bothering me about watching this show is that I don't trust a word of it. I don't trust Jamie because while most of the stuff he says on camera (earlier on, anyway) doesn't conflate weight and health, I have no way of knowing what he said off-camera. On top of that, I don't trust the editing because the best way to make a show popular to show the extremes of things. So you get moments like the Edwards family being taken to the doctor by Jamie and the girl on his cooking team weeping about how her fat is killing her.

What if the Edwards don't have insurance? They've got four kids. That's an expensive doctor's visit without it.

What is that girl's family history? Is her family obese? Do they have similar issues?

This stuff doesn't occur in a vacuum, and the way this show presents its narrative there's no way to discern the truth.

UGH.
redstapler: (Default)
Zuh?

I don't know what y'all are saying about "it gets better."

It's gotten worse.

They keep trotting out Death Fats tearfully telling us how their fat is killing them, or family members of people who've died because of complications from obesity.

Jamie finally talks to skinny teenagers, and instead of talking about health, he tells them that french fries will make their bottoms wider.

He shows that crappy DJ a fucking death fat coffin specially designed for a larger corpse.

THIS ISN'T BETTER, PEOPLE, THIS IS WORSE.

Ep 5 Edit: Hooray for the local hospital admins (all of whom were thin, btw) calling him out on his fat-shaming PR stunts. (Namely, taking the DJ to the funeral home to see the oversize coffin.)

I'm also interested to note that a lot of the kids in the high school aren't fat. There's some, but the ZOMG DETHFATZ they keep trotting out don't seem to be the norm...at least not in these shots.

If there's anything that's truly bothering me about watching this show is that I don't trust a word of it. I don't trust Jamie because while most of the stuff he says on camera (earlier on, anyway) doesn't conflate weight and health, I have no way of knowing what he said off-camera. On top of that, I don't trust the editing because the best way to make a show popular to show the extremes of things. So you get moments like the Edwards family being taken to the doctor by Jamie and the girl on his cooking team weeping about how her fat is killing her.

What if the Edwards don't have insurance? They've got four kids. That's an expensive doctor's visit without it.

What is that girl's family history? Is her family obese? Do they have similar issues?

This stuff doesn't occur in a vacuum, and the way this show presents its narrative there's no way to discern the truth.

UGH.
redstapler: (Mustard)
Huh.

So it's both better and worse than I thought it would be.

Jamie himself doesn't verbally conflate weight and health. There are, however, many shots of headless fatties, and the Edwards, the family he goes to "help" (more on them in a moment) are definitely all fat.

He doesn't say to any of them "If you eat better, you will lose weight,"--until one of the kids brings it up first. Is it possible that conversation was had with him starting it, and it didn't make it on the episode? Absolutely.

I was both intrigued and horrified by the way he cooked all their week's food and put it all on the table to "show how unhealthy it is." Stacie, the mom, definitely looked horrified. It would have been really offensive (and it still was, don't get me wrong!) if she hadn't seemed actually stunned by what she saw. Either she's a fantastic actress, or this really was something she had a blind spot for. I know I think back to the way I ate in college, and it was all fried, covered in cheese, fast food, chain restaurants, thousands of calories per meal, etc. There's nothing morally wrong with that, but I certainly wasn't eating healthfully. I'm sure had I been shown on one table all of that stuff, I would have had a similar reaction as Mrs. Edwards.

Back to the show, aside from the people he's choosing to talk to, all of whom are fat, he's not saying to any one person YOUR FAT IS KILLING YOU. He's saying "your food choices are killing you," which is a different conversation.The language used by the show is that the town has a high incidence of diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. I'd love to see them use skinny people in examples of those, and I'm irritated by the headless fatty shots. They're speaking out of both sides of their mouths with the things they're *saying* are "health, diabetes, etc," but the images they're *showing* are "Fatty fat fat fats."

The person who I really did want to smack? Pastor Steve. God, what a fat-shaming mansplainer. I understand the genesis (hurr durr) of his concern trolling: He's watching his congregation die at an alarming rate from preventable illnesses, but he's consistently saying it's because they're fat. When he paged through the church yearbook, I would be interested to know if any of the people he pointed to were not fat, but still had diabetes, heart disease, suffered strokes, etc.

But back to Jamie. I find him appealing and eventually respectful. There are moments where he steps in it ("Lunch lady" for example), gets called out for it, and he apologizes and asks the correct way to address the situation. I'd find him more irritating if he didn't seem (at least nominally) willing to learn the issues he's mishandling.

He is, however, really missing the boat on the "money and time don't grow on trees" issue. I do hope it gets addressed in later episodes.

I could really do without his constant drumbeating and occasional weeping into the camera about how he "just wants to HELP these people!" I know the very premise of this show is concern trolling, but I feel that element could be handled at least a little better.
redstapler: (Default)
Huh.

So it's both better and worse than I thought it would be.

Jamie himself doesn't verbally conflate weight and health. There are, however, many shots of headless fatties, and the Edwards, the family he goes to "help" (more on them in a moment) are definitely all fat.

He doesn't say to any of them "If you eat better, you will lose weight,"--until one of the kids brings it up first. Is it possible that conversation was had with him starting it, and it didn't make it on the episode? Absolutely.

I was both intrigued and horrified by the way he cooked all their week's food and put it all on the table to "show how unhealthy it is." Stacie, the mom, definitely looked horrified. It would have been really offensive (and it still was, don't get me wrong!) if she hadn't seemed actually stunned by what she saw. Either she's a fantastic actress, or this really was something she had a blind spot for. I know I think back to the way I ate in college, and it was all fried, covered in cheese, fast food, chain restaurants, thousands of calories per meal, etc. There's nothing morally wrong with that, but I certainly wasn't eating healthfully. I'm sure had I been shown on one table all of that stuff, I would have had a similar reaction as Mrs. Edwards.

Back to the show, aside from the people he's choosing to talk to, all of whom are fat, he's not saying to any one person YOUR FAT IS KILLING YOU. He's saying "your food choices are killing you," which is a different conversation.The language used by the show is that the town has a high incidence of diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. I'd love to see them use skinny people in examples of those, and I'm irritated by the headless fatty shots. They're speaking out of both sides of their mouths with the things they're *saying* are "health, diabetes, etc," but the images they're *showing* are "Fatty fat fat fats."

The person who I really did want to smack? Pastor Steve. God, what a fat-shaming mansplainer. I understand the genesis (hurr durr) of his concern trolling: He's watching his congregation die at an alarming rate from preventable illnesses, but he's consistently saying it's because they're fat. When he paged through the church yearbook, I would be interested to know if any of the people he pointed to were not fat, but still had diabetes, heart disease, suffered strokes, etc.

But back to Jamie. I find him appealing and eventually respectful. There are moments where he steps in it ("Lunch lady" for example), gets called out for it, and he apologizes and asks the correct way to address the situation. I'd find him more irritating if he didn't seem (at least nominally) willing to learn the issues he's mishandling.

He is, however, really missing the boat on the "money and time don't grow on trees" issue. I do hope it gets addressed in later episodes.

I could really do without his constant drumbeating and occasional weeping into the camera about how he "just wants to HELP these people!" I know the very premise of this show is concern trolling, but I feel that element could be handled at least a little better.
redstapler: (Hmm)
I confess, I haven't seen an episode of Jamie Oliver's Food Revolution.

I've heard two very contradictory opinions from sources I trust.

One point of view says that he's addressing a very real problem about the quality of food in schools, the growing dependence on pre-made meals, and worse, the growing ignorance of basic cooking skills.

The other point of view says that he's a privileged wankadoodle who thinks money and time grow on trees, and what is it any of his business what people eat or weigh?

Not having seen the show, but having opinions about this sort of topic, I imagine the truth is somewhere in the middle.

On his website, there is now a petition.

In one box, it has this message from Jamie: "If you care about the health of your children and the food they eat please sign this petition now."

In a box next to it is has this message "from you" for the petition: "Sign Jamie's petition to save cooking skills and improve school food.

I support the Food Revolution. America's kids need better food at school and better health prospects. We need to keep cooking skills alive."


I feel like those messages are contradictory.

Jamie's message conflates weight and health, which is a HUGE issue.

"Our" message demands better and more healthy food at schools, and to improve education on how to cook. That's kind of important.

Not to quote a truly bizarre source, but uh...did any of you ever see the movie Heavyweights?

It's about a kid who goes to a fat camp that got sold to a fitness madman (played hilariously by Ben Stiller in an obvious precursor to his role in Dodgeball), the kids stage a coup, and run the camp their way.

In their renewed vision of the camp, they have a fucking blast being kids in a warm, positive environment, and one of the clips in the montage includes a cooking class. Not a "how to cook low fat meals" class, but an honest to goodness class on how to cook food that tastes good.

I've seen with my own eyes people eat more healthfully once they start to learn to cook because they're caring about the quality of the components they're using, not which frozen meal is on special that week.

I realize this veers back into the "money and time don't grow on trees" category. However, I get the sense that part of "The Food Revolution" is a movement to bring better food options to underserved neighborhoods.

Anyway, I hope that the good intentions of this show and movement aren't paving a certain road. I hope that there's an understanding that weight and health aren't one and the same. I hope that there's an understanding that sometimes living off of canned and frozen items is all a person can do.

But I really hope that this show isn't all the bad that I've heard, and none of the good.

ETA: [livejournal.com profile] kalmn points to this post on Shakesville in which they point out all the ways the Revolution failed one town. It's pretty jarring.
redstapler: (Default)
I confess, I haven't seen an episode of Jamie Oliver's Food Revolution.

I've heard two very contradictory opinions from sources I trust.

One point of view says that he's addressing a very real problem about the quality of food in schools, the growing dependence on pre-made meals, and worse, the growing ignorance of basic cooking skills.

The other point of view says that he's a privileged wankadoodle who thinks money and time grow on trees, and what is it any of his business what people eat or weigh?

Not having seen the show, but having opinions about this sort of topic, I imagine the truth is somewhere in the middle.

On his website, there is now a petition.

In one box, it has this message from Jamie: "If you care about the health of your children and the food they eat please sign this petition now."

In a box next to it is has this message "from you" for the petition: "Sign Jamie's petition to save cooking skills and improve school food.

I support the Food Revolution. America's kids need better food at school and better health prospects. We need to keep cooking skills alive."


I feel like those messages are contradictory.

Jamie's message conflates weight and health, which is a HUGE issue.

"Our" message demands better and more healthy food at schools, and to improve education on how to cook. That's kind of important.

Not to quote a truly bizarre source, but uh...did any of you ever see the movie Heavyweights?

It's about a kid who goes to a fat camp that got sold to a fitness madman (played hilariously by Ben Stiller in an obvious precursor to his role in Dodgeball), the kids stage a coup, and run the camp their way.

In their renewed vision of the camp, they have a fucking blast being kids in a warm, positive environment, and one of the clips in the montage includes a cooking class. Not a "how to cook low fat meals" class, but an honest to goodness class on how to cook food that tastes good.

I've seen with my own eyes people eat more healthfully once they start to learn to cook because they're caring about the quality of the components they're using, not which frozen meal is on special that week.

I realize this veers back into the "money and time don't grow on trees" category. However, I get the sense that part of "The Food Revolution" is a movement to bring better food options to underserved neighborhoods.

Anyway, I hope that the good intentions of this show and movement aren't paving a certain road. I hope that there's an understanding that weight and health aren't one and the same. I hope that there's an understanding that sometimes living off of canned and frozen items is all a person can do.

But I really hope that this show isn't all the bad that I've heard, and none of the good.

ETA: [livejournal.com profile] kalmn points to this post on Shakesville in which they point out all the ways the Revolution failed one town. It's pretty jarring.

Profile

redstapler: (Default)
A Punk Rock Joan Holloway Trying To Be Ianto Jones

October 2016

S M T W T F S
      1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031     

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Sep. 26th, 2017 02:43 pm
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios